So much stuff

how humans discovered tools invented meaning and made more of everything
Chip Colwell
Book - 2023

Over three million years ago, our ancient ancestors realized that rocks could be broken into sharp-edged objects for slicing meat, making the first knives. This discovery resulted in a good meal, and eventually changed the fate of our species and our planet. With So Much Stuff, archaeologist Chip Colwell sets out to investigate why humankind went from self-sufficient primates to nonstop shoppers, from needing nothing to needing everything. Along the way, he uncovers spectacular and strange points around the world--an Italian cave with the world's first known painted art, a Hong Kong skyscraper where a priestess channels the gods, and a mountain of trash that rivals the Statue of Liberty. Through these examples, Colwell shows how humanity took three leaps that led to stuff becoming inseparable from our lives, inspiring a love affair with things that may lead to our downfall. Now, as landfills brim and oceans drown in trash, Colwell issues a timely call to reevaluate our relationship with the things that both created and threaten to undo our overstuffed planet.

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Barcode Status Material Type CallNumber Availability
37413321965115 Aged to lost New Adult Non-Fiction 178 COLWELL  Place A Hold
Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Colwell, Chip (John Stephen), 1975-
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, [2023]
Subjects:

MARC

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246 3 0 |a How humans discovered tools, invented meaning, and made more of everything 
264 1 |a Chicago :  |b University of Chicago Press,  |c [2023] 
300 |a 323 pages :  |b illustrations ;  |c 24 cm 
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504 |a Includes bibliographical references and index. 
505 0 |a On the origin of things: an introduction -- Leap 1: Make tools -- First things first -- The matter at hand -- Everything under the sun -- Leap 2: Make meaning -- A thing of beauty -- Articles of faith -- Dress coded -- Leap 3: Make more -- In the thick of things -- A material world -- Too much of a good thing -- On the future of things: A conclusion. 
520 |a Over three million years ago, our ancient ancestors realized that rocks could be broken into sharp-edged objects for slicing meat, making the first knives. This discovery resulted in a good meal, and eventually changed the fate of our species and our planet. With So Much Stuff, archaeologist Chip Colwell sets out to investigate why humankind went from self-sufficient primates to nonstop shoppers, from needing nothing to needing everything. Along the way, he uncovers spectacular and strange points around the world--an Italian cave with the world's first known painted art, a Hong Kong skyscraper where a priestess channels the gods, and a mountain of trash that rivals the Statue of Liberty. Through these examples, Colwell shows how humanity took three leaps that led to stuff becoming inseparable from our lives, inspiring a love affair with things that may lead to our downfall. Now, as landfills brim and oceans drown in trash, Colwell issues a timely call to reevaluate our relationship with the things that both created and threaten to undo our overstuffed planet. 
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