Watching darkness fall

FDR his ambassadors and the rise of Adolf Hitler
David McKean
Book - 2021

"A gripping and groundbreaking account of how all but one of FDR's ambassadors in Europe misjudged Hitler and his intentions. As German tanks rolled toward Paris in late May 1940, the U.S. Ambassador to France, William Bullitt, was determined to stay put, holed up in the Chateau St. Firmin in Chantilly, his country residence. Bullitt told the president that he would neither evacuate the embassy nor his chateau, an eighteenth Renaissance manse with a wine cellar of over 18,000 bottles, even though "we have only two revolvers in this entire mission with only forty bullets." As German forces closed in on the French capital, Bullitt wrote the president, "In case I should get blown up before I see you again, I want you to know that it has been marvelous to work for you." As the fighting raged in France, across the English Channel, Ambassador to Great Britain Joseph P. Kennedy wrote to his wife Rose, "The situation is more than critical. It means a terrible finish for the allies." Watching Darkness Fall will recount the rise of the Third Reich in Germany and the road to war from the perspective of four American diplomats in Europe who witnessed it firsthand: Joseph Kennedy, William Dodd, Breckinridge Long, and William Bullitt, who all served in key Western European capitals-London, Berlin, Rome, Paris, and Moscow-in the years prior to World War II. In many ways they were America's first line of defense and they often communicated with the president directly, as Roosevelt's eyes and ears on the ground. Unfortunately, most of them underestimated the power and resolve of Adolf Hitler and Germany's Third Reich. Watching Darkness Fall is a gripping new history of the years leading up to and the beginning of WWII in Europe told through the lives of five well-educated and mostly wealthy men all vying for the attention of the man in the Oval Office"--

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Barcode Status Material Type CallNumber Availability
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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: McKean, David, 1956- (Author)
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: New York : St. Martin's Press, 2021.
Edition:First edition.
Subjects:

MARC

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245 1 0 |a Watching darkness fall :  |b FDR, his ambassadors, and the rise of Adolf Hitler /  |c David McKean. 
246 3 0 |a FDR, his ambassadors, and the rise of Adolf Hitler 
250 |a First edition. 
264 1 |a New York :  |b St. Martin's Press,  |c 2021. 
264 4 |c ©2021 
300 |a xii, 396 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates :  |b illustrations, portraits ;  |c 25 cm 
336 |a text  |b txt  |2 rdacontent 
337 |a unmediated  |b n  |2 rdamedia 
338 |a volume  |b nc  |2 rdacarrier 
504 |a Includes bibliographical references (pages 361-366) and index. 
505 0 |a Prologue: Happy Days Are Here Again -- This is a Day of National Consecration -- A Small, Obscure Austrian House Painter -- The Striped-Pants Boys -- I Want You to Go to Germany as an Ambassador -- The Vehicle Occupied by Great Caesar's Ghost -- Some Changes Are in Order -- I Wonder If You Would Try to Get the President More Interested in Foreign Affairs -- I Am Much Too Fond of You All -- Just Think What the Career Boys Will Say! -- Ambassador Long Was Swell to Us -- Downhearted About Europe -- What a Mess It All Is! -- Without Doubt the Most Hair-Trigger Times -- If Men Were Christian, There Would Be No War -- Hypnotized by Mussolini -- Pack Up Your Furniture, the Dog, and the Servants -- I Hate War -- I Still Don't Like the European Outlook -- What a Grand Fight It Is Going to Be! -- Joe, Just Look at Your Legs -- Everybody Down the Line Will Be Sent to Siam -- May God ... Prove That You Are Wrong -- Resistance and War Will Follow -- I Could Scarcely Believe Such Things Could Occur -- Methods, Short of War -- The Last Well-Known Man About Whom That Was Said -- My Mother Does Not Approve of Cocktails -- It's Come at Last-God Help Us -- I'm Tired, I Can't Take It -- One Mind Instead of Four Separate Minds -- Churchill Is the Best Man England Has -- My Mother Alice Who Met a Rabbit -- The Hand That Held the Dagger Has Struck it into the Back of Its Neighbor -- I've Told You, Eleanor, You Must Not Say That -- I Get Constant Reports of How Valuable You Are -- Your Boys Are Not Going to Be Sent into Any Foreign Wars -- We Will Talk About That and the Future Later -- He Can Talk to Churchill Like an Iowa Farmer -- We Americans Are Vitally Concerned in Your Defense of Freedom -- History Has Recorded Who Fired the First Shot -- A Day That Will Live in Infamy. 
520 |a "A gripping and groundbreaking account of how all but one of FDR's ambassadors in Europe misjudged Hitler and his intentions. As German tanks rolled toward Paris in late May 1940, the U.S. Ambassador to France, William Bullitt, was determined to stay put, holed up in the Chateau St. Firmin in Chantilly, his country residence. Bullitt told the president that he would neither evacuate the embassy nor his chateau, an eighteenth Renaissance manse with a wine cellar of over 18,000 bottles, even though "we have only two revolvers in this entire mission with only forty bullets." As German forces closed in on the French capital, Bullitt wrote the president, "In case I should get blown up before I see you again, I want you to know that it has been marvelous to work for you." As the fighting raged in France, across the English Channel, Ambassador to Great Britain Joseph P. Kennedy wrote to his wife Rose, "The situation is more than critical. It means a terrible finish for the allies." Watching Darkness Fall will recount the rise of the Third Reich in Germany and the road to war from the perspective of four American diplomats in Europe who witnessed it firsthand: Joseph Kennedy, William Dodd, Breckinridge Long, and William Bullitt, who all served in key Western European capitals-London, Berlin, Rome, Paris, and Moscow-in the years prior to World War II. In many ways they were America's first line of defense and they often communicated with the president directly, as Roosevelt's eyes and ears on the ground. Unfortunately, most of them underestimated the power and resolve of Adolf Hitler and Germany's Third Reich. Watching Darkness Fall is a gripping new history of the years leading up to and the beginning of WWII in Europe told through the lives of five well-educated and mostly wealthy men all vying for the attention of the man in the Oval Office"--  |c Provided by publisher 
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651 0 |a Germany  |x Foreign public opinion, American  |x History  |y 20th century. 
651 0 |a United States  |x Foreign relations  |z Europe. 
651 0 |a Europe  |x Foreign relations  |z United States. 
650 0 |a World War, 1939-1945  |x Diplomatic history. 
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